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Home > fundamentalism / shrinking secular space > Islam’s persecution of atheists

Islam’s persecution of atheists

Friday 8 November 2013, by siawi3

Source: http://community.beliefnet.com/go/thread/view/34789/26479397/Islams_persecution_of_atheists

3 years ago :: Dec 18, 2010 - 6:28PM #1
steven_guy

My understand is that atheists are at best second class citizens in Islamic countries and, at worst, are in danger of persecution, imprisonment and death.

From the Wikipedia:

Islamic countries

Atheists, or those accused of holding atheistic beliefs, may be subject to discrimination and persecution in some Islamic countries. According to popular interpretations of Islam, Muslims are not free to change religion or become an atheist: denying Islam and thus becoming an apostate is traditionally punished by death in men and by life imprisonment in women, though in only three Islamic countries is apostasy currently subject to capital punishment. Since an apostate can be considered a Muslim whose beliefs cast doubt on the Divine, and/or Koran, claims of atheism and apostasy have been made against Muslim scholars and political opponents throughout history.[55][56][57]

In Iran, atheists do not have any recognized legal status, and must declare that they are Muslim, Christian, Jewish or Zoroastrian, in order to claim some legal rights, including applying for entrance to university,[58] or becoming a lawyer.[59] Similarly, Jordan requires atheists to associate themselves with a recognized religion for official identification purposes,[60] and atheists in Indonesia experience official discrimination in the context of registration of births and marriages, and the issuance of identity cards.[61] In Egypt, intellectuals suspected of holding atheistic beliefs have been prosecuted by judicial and religious authorities. Novelist Alaa Hamad was convicted of publishing a book that contained atheistic ideas and apostasy that were considered to threaten national unity and social peace.[62][63] Compulsory religious instruction in Turkish schools is also considered discriminatory towards atheists.[64]

[edit] Africa

In Algeria, the study of Islam is a requirement in public and private schools for every Algerian child, irrespective of his/her religion.[65]

Atheist or agnostic men are prohibited from marrying Muslim women (Algerian Family Code I.II.31).[1], A marriage is legally nullified by the apostasy of the husband (presumably from Islam, although this is not specified; Family Code I.III.33.) Atheists and agnostics cannot inherit (Family Code III.I.138.)